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Ghorepani- Poon Hill trek heaven on earth

I decided to utilize my Dashain Holiday ( before Dashain Tika)  going to trekking. As I have been dreaming to go to Ghorepani – Poon Hill trek for long time I  together with my family members began our  journey. We left Kathmandu on 10th October. After 7 hours ride from KTM we reach  Pokhara.  After one hour drive from Pokhara we reach Nayapul( 45km). From Nayapul we begin to trek to Tikhedhunga. After 15- minutes short walk along the bank of the Modi Khola, we reach Birethanti (1065m) a large village that has many shops & tea houses. From there, the trail continues through the village.

Modhi Khola

Modhi Khola

The trail climbs steadily up the side of the valley to Hile at 1495m & after the short climb, we reach Tikhedhunga at 1525m. This trek offers a short & relatively easy day, during journey & allows us to become used to the experience of trekking in Nepal.

Way to Tikhe Dhunga

Way to Tikhe Dhunga

After Tikhedhunga we start to climb to  steep Ulleri. Ulleri is  a large Magar village at 2070m. It is tough to climb Ulleri, you have to hold your breath for many times.  We decided to stay at Ulleri that night.

Hotel @ Ulleri

Hotel @ Ulleri

                                             Ulleri                    Ulleri

view from Ulleri

view from Ulleri

Next day we walk to Banthanti at 2250m .  The trail is much easier and continues to ascend more gently, through fine forests of oak & rhododendron towards. Then we make our trek towards Nangethanti at 2460m. After an hour walk brings you to Ghorepani at 2775m.

before climbing Ulleri

before climbing Ulleri

              
on the way to Banthati

on the way to Banthati

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hiking to  Poon Hill – back to Ghorepani, and trek to Nayapul

We  get up early in the morning, and go for hiking to Poon Hill. From here you will see superb view of sunrise, and panoramic view of Himalayas, including Mt. Dhaulagiri, Annapurna South, Fishtail, and so on. This trek route  offers the spectacular mountain scenery along with charming villages inhabited particularly by the Gurungs & Magars, dense rhododendron forests full of birds and deep sub-tropical valleys, all set below the Annapurna with the picturesque peak of Machhapuchhare (Fishtail Peak) dominating the skyline.

@ Poon Hill

@ Poon Hil

Poon Hill

Poon Hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the important highlight of this trip is to make a climb on Poon Hill, possibly the most spectacular mountain scales on Earth. When sun rises, it touches the snow-capped summits the Himalayan giants, Dhaulagiri (8,167m) and Annapurna (8,091m) along with a maze of other peaks, there gradually appear, just like magic that your eye could not believe.

Mountain range

Mountain range

IMG_6363

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After visiting Poon Hill, we came back to Ghorepani, have a hot breakfast, and continue walking to Ulleri. Leaving Ulleri we follow the same trekking trail and reach Nayapul.

The best months to go for the Poon Hill trekking are October, November, December, February, March and April. You can go to Poonhill via Ghandruk trail also.  Due to limited schedule and to put on Dashain Tika it was rush trek for me.  I finished my trekking in one night and two days from Pokhara. If you have time five days would be enough time for you. After all, my trekking  was the most exciting and wonderful trek with  unforgettable experiences.

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Purify your Body, Speech and Mind with this sacred Mantra

The mantra of Padmasambhava   called the Vajra Guru Mantra, OM AH HUM VAJRA GURU is one of the sacred mantra in Tibetan Buddhism which purifies your body, speech and mind if you recite it in a proper way.

The Vajra Guru mantra, OM AH HUM VAJRA GURU PADMA SIDDHI HUM ,is pronounced by Tibetans: Om Ah Hung Benza Guru Péma Siddhi Hung.

Vajra Guru Mantra  Courtesy : Google

Vajra Guru Mantra
Courtesy : Google

OM AH HUM

The syllables OM AH HUM have outer, inner, and “secret “meanings. OM stands for the body, AH For the speech, and HUM for the mind. They represent the transformative blessings of the body, speech, and mind of all the Buddha’s.

VAJRA

VAJRA is compared to the diamond, the strongest and most precious of stones. Just as a diamond can cut through anything but is  itself completely indestructible ,so the unchanging ,non dual wisdom of the Buddha’s can never be harmed or destroyed by ignorance ,and can cut through all delusion and obscurations.

GURU

GURU means “weighty”; someone replete with every wonderful quality, who embodies wisdom, knowledge, compassion, and skillful. Just as gold is the weightiest and most precious of metals, so the inconceivable, flawless qualities of the Guru the master make him unsurpassable, and above all things in excellence.

PADMA

PADMA means lotus, and signifies the Lotus family of the Buddha’s, and specifically their aspect of enlightened speech. As Padmasambhava is the direct emanation, the Nirmanakaya, of Bud-dha Amitabha, who is the primordial Buddha of the Lotus family, he  is known as” PADMA.”His name Padmasambhava, the” Lotus-born,” in fact refers to the story of his birth on a blossoming lotus flower.

SIDDHI HUM

SIDDHI means “real accomplishment,””attainment,””blessing,” and” realization.”There are two kinds of siddhis: ordinary and  supreme. Through receiving the blessing of ordinary siddhis, all

obstacles in our lives, such as ill-health, are removed, all our good  aspirations are fulfilled ,benefits like wealth and prosperity and long  life accretes, and all of life’s various circumstances become auspicious and conducive to spiritual practice, and the realization of  enlightenment.  SIDDHI HUM is said to draw in all the siddhis like a magnet that attracts iron filings.

HUM represents the wisdom mind of the Buddha’s, and is the sacred catalyst of the mantra. It is like proclaiming its power and truth:”So be it!”

The essential meaning of the mantra is: “I invoke you, the Vajra Guru,  Padmasambhava,by your blessing may you grant us ordinary and supreme siddhis,”  ( Tibetan Book of Living and dying)